CoBrA: The Hollaender Collection

$9.95

During the middle of the 20th century, a group of artists from three Northern European countries organized, issued a manifesto, and exhibited together for three years (1948-51) under the collective title “CoBrA.” This catalog includes representative works by CoBrA artists from the Hollaender collection, many pieces of which are part of the Chazen permanent collection.

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Description

During the middle of the 20th century, a group of artists from three Northern European countries organized, issued a manifesto, and exhibited together for three years (1948-51) under the collective title “CoBrA.” This group evolved within the context of social, political, economic, and cultural chaos of post-war Europe, and also in response to a variety of ideas and theories which had gained currency during the first half of the century. CoBrA disbanded, but its brief existence had a tremendous impact on the later works of artists who participated in it, as well as on artists who came after.

Alumnus Alexander Hollaender and his wife, Henrietta, collected paintings, sculpture, and works on paper for more than 50 years. They focused on America, Europe, and South and Central America art from the 1950s to the 1970s, and donated their collection gradually between 1979 and 1992.

The Hollaender Collection includes representative works by CoBrA artists as well as examples of Art Brut and Art Informel by the most influential members such as Jean Dubuffet, Carl Henning-Pedersen, Alberto Burri, Hans Hartung, and Antonio Saura. The best known of the CoBrA works is Clown of 1954 by Karel Appel. The collection also includes The Eagle by Germaine Richier, a colorful kinetic piece by Pol Bury, a welded iron sculpture by David Smith, and bronzes by Joán Miró and Max Ernst, and work by many other artists such as Anton Rooskens, Theo Wolvecamp, Alexander Calder, Adolph Gottlieb, Barbara Hepworth, Hans Hofmann, Louise Nevelson, and David Smith.

Publisher: Chazen Museum of Art (1981)

Foreword: Katherine Harper Mead

Introduction: Carlton Overland

 

Additional information

Weight .8 lbs
Dimensions 8 × 11 × .5 in